A Nagarazoku in Japan

Snapshots out of living in Japan
Went shopping in Japan …

Went shopping in Japan …

One of this year’s trends in yukata

One of this year’s trends in yukata

What Cultural Appropriation is NOT

chaotically-neutral:

Cultural appropriation is real and can be very harmful, but Tumblr en masse has grossly misdefined it. Here are some examples of what isn’t cultural appropriation:

- Eating food from another culture
- Properly practicing a religion from another culture.
- Listening…

(Source: )

Double-rainbow over Tōkyō

Double-rainbow over Tōkyō

mykoreanhusband:

One step outside

The same here currently in Japan -.- Why do I even bother in the morning?

mykoreanhusband:

One step outside

The same here currently in Japan -.- Why do I even bother in the morning?

misskrone:

missdoodle:

shrineart:

joyfulldreams:

senpaibowie:

etirabys:

skull-bearer:

lolatsjw:

ifonlyfor:

nouveau-brut:

humansofnewyork:

"Two other people took my picture before you, so I was already popular."

I know that some people said in the comments that this outfit was culturally appropriative, but just remember that you don’t know that someone isn’t a POC or biracial just by looking at them. Don’t assume other people’s races. 

^ My immediate reaction was to be upset by this photo because, I’m sorry, I’m just so fucking sick of people stealing Asian outfits and making them cool or trendy. But then I thought that maybe she’s a mixed kid. If not, there’s a problem here, though.

Hi. I’m actually Japanese. Most of us LIKE when people find beauty in our culture. As long as nobody is disrespecting us or making a mockery of us, then there isn’t a problem, and if you think there is, then it seems that you are in favor of cultural segregation and that is causing more harm than good.

When I was in Japan, there were a lot of places where you could get done up in a kimono or the male equivalent and have your picture taken. No one cares.

Most Korean people I know are pretty delighted when foreigners wear hanbok, in a “oh, you are appreciating our culture! you look good in that” way. I have never actually heard or heard of people reacting negatively to non-Korean people wearing traditional Korean clothes, unless they were racist to begin with and would have objected to foreigners regardless of what they were wearing.
'Appropriation' is, I think, only appropriation when either it is done in a blatantly disrespectful way, or if the group whose clothes (etc) are being adopted is culturally marginalized to the degree where they themselves face discrimination when they wear those things.
Korean people, afaik, don’t give a fuck. When foreigners visit and wear our clothes, it’s in good fun by people who are usually appreciative of the aesthetic qualities of what they’re donning, and also because we ourselves have never faced discrimination for our nationality or traditional dress.
uhhh, basically, intent matters, context matters, people within the same community often have radically different ideas of what’s okay. But you know, I think the only Koreans I know who’d potentially care are the American-raised ones on liberal, activisty college campuses who are extremely well versed in the liberal, activisty language and rulebook.

Thank you!!

I also think it makes a difference in that the clothing is, you know, the actual thing and not some vaguely exotic knock-off like most people do with native american clothing. Like this is a legit, actual Kimono. There’s nothing really in the culture OF kimono that has rules about who wears this sort of thing when. Like…kimono literally means “thing you wear”. -shrug-

Bolded some of the things that stood out the most to me.

Appreciation and Appropriation are not the same thing, lets keep that in mind :/ 

Some people just go overboard….

misskrone:

missdoodle:

shrineart:

joyfulldreams:

senpaibowie:

etirabys:

skull-bearer:

lolatsjw:

ifonlyfor:

nouveau-brut:

humansofnewyork:

"Two other people took my picture before you, so I was already popular."

I know that some people said in the comments that this outfit was culturally appropriative, but just remember that you don’t know that someone isn’t a POC or biracial just by looking at them. Don’t assume other people’s races. 

^ My immediate reaction was to be upset by this photo because, I’m sorry, I’m just so fucking sick of people stealing Asian outfits and making them cool or trendy. But then I thought that maybe she’s a mixed kid. If not, there’s a problem here, though.

Hi. I’m actually Japanese. Most of us LIKE when people find beauty in our culture. As long as nobody is disrespecting us or making a mockery of us, then there isn’t a problem, and if you think there is, then it seems that you are in favor of cultural segregation and that is causing more harm than good.
When I was in Japan, there were a lot of places where you could get done up in a kimono or the male equivalent and have your picture taken. No one cares.

Most Korean people I know are pretty delighted when foreigners wear hanbok, in a “oh, you are appreciating our culture! you look good in that” way. I have never actually heard or heard of people reacting negatively to non-Korean people wearing traditional Korean clothes, unless they were racist to begin with and would have objected to foreigners regardless of what they were wearing.

'Appropriation' is, I think, only appropriation when either it is done in a blatantly disrespectful way, or if the group whose clothes (etc) are being adopted is culturally marginalized to the degree where they themselves face discrimination when they wear those things.

Korean people, afaik, don’t give a fuck. When foreigners visit and wear our clothes, it’s in good fun by people who are usually appreciative of the aesthetic qualities of what they’re donning, and also because we ourselves have never faced discrimination for our nationality or traditional dress.

uhhh, basically, intent matters, context matters, people within the same community often have radically different ideas of what’s okay. But you know, I think the only Koreans I know who’d potentially care are the American-raised ones on liberal, activisty college campuses who are extremely well versed in the liberal, activisty language and rulebook.

Thank you!!

I also think it makes a difference in that the clothing is, you know, the actual thing and not some vaguely exotic knock-off like most people do with native american clothing. Like this is a legit, actual Kimono. There’s nothing really in the culture OF kimono that has rules about who wears this sort of thing when. Like…kimono literally means “thing you wear”. -shrug-

Bolded some of the things that stood out the most to me.

Appreciation and Appropriation are not the same thing, lets keep that in mind :/ 

Some people just go overboard….

japanloverme:

In Japan, the Tanabata festival is celebrated every 7th day of the 7th month (July 7).  But since our theme this month is all about Japanese legends and folklore (and love  ♥), here’s the story behind the popular tradition. (。・ω・。)ノ♡♡ The Legend of the Tanabata ♡むかしむかし, Orihime (the “Weaving Princess”), the daughter of the King of the Skies, helped her father in decorating the sky. While her father made and hung stars in the sky, she weaved a very fine, delicate and beautiful cloth-like material, which we now know as clouds. ꒰●꒡ ̫ ꒡●꒱Orihime’s weaving was so skillful that the King of the Skies was so proud of her. She worked hard day and night, until one day, her father noticed that she looked ill. He let her rest for the day, and allowed her to do whatever she pleased.Orihime was so happy with this! She went and played along the Heavenly River (the Milky Way), and she danced among the stars. Across the river, she saw Hikoboshi, the Cow-herder star (he took care of the Heavenly cows that help produce the Milky Way). In turn, he also caught sight of her.The two approached each other by crossing the only bridge that stretched across the wide river. Upon meeting at the middle of the bridge, they greeted each other casually and warmly. Hikoboshi asked Orihime if she wanted to come with him so he could show her around. Orihime, who always wanted to explore life outside her weaving routine, immediately agreed. Orihime and Hikoboshi had so much fun exploring the skies. They became friends easily, and soon they felt that they were falling in love with each other. ♡(*´・ω・)(・ω・`*)♡Orihime was so happy that she forgot to come home. The King of the Skies was so worried, that he sent some magpies to search for her and guide her back to him. When the magpies found her, she ignored them because she didn’t want to come home yet, she wanted to stay with Hikoboshi.When the magpies returned to the King of the Skies with this news, he was outraged! He fetched Orihime himself, forced her to come home, then destroyed the only bridge on the Heavenly River. He also made the river deeper and wider that it already was. He forbade the two to ever meet again.Orihime and Hikoboshi were distraught. Orihime understood that as the Weaving Princess, she had certain responsibilities, but she missed Hikoboshi so terribly. With tears in her eyes, she asked her father if they could somehow settle for an agreement. Her father could not bear to see tears in her precious daughter’s eyes, so he told her that if she works hard for a year, he will let her see Hikoboshi once a year, on the 7th day of the 7th month.From then on, on every 7th day of the 7th month, a flock of magpies forms a bridge on the Heavenly river, allowing Orihime and Hikoboshi to be with each other. In return, Orihime worked hard in weaving clouds, mist and fog for the rest of the year, until the end of time.The End ~ ✩✩✩So that’s the story of the Tanabata!  Hope you enjoyed it~ ♡^▽^♡www.japanlover.me
www.instagram.com/JapanLoverMe
Art by littlemisspaintbrush ♥

japanloverme:

In Japan, the Tanabata festival is celebrated every 7th day of the 7th month (July 7).  But since our theme this month is all about Japanese legends and folklore (and love  ♥), here’s the story behind the popular tradition. (。・ω・。)ノ♡

♡ The Legend of the Tanabata ♡

むかしむかし, Orihime (the “Weaving Princess”), the daughter of the King of the Skies, helped her father in decorating the sky. While her father made and hung stars in the sky, she weaved a very fine, delicate and beautiful cloth-like material, which we now know as clouds. ꒰●꒡ ̫ ꒡●꒱

Orihime’s weaving was so skillful that the King of the Skies was so proud of her. She worked hard day and night, until one day, her father noticed that she looked ill. He let her rest for the day, and allowed her to do whatever she pleased.

Orihime was so happy with this! She went and played along the Heavenly River (the Milky Way), and she danced among the stars. Across the river, she saw Hikoboshi, the Cow-herder star (he took care of the Heavenly cows that help produce the Milky Way). In turn, he also caught sight of her.

The two approached each other by crossing the only bridge that stretched across the wide river. Upon meeting at the middle of the bridge, they greeted each other casually and warmly. Hikoboshi asked Orihime if she wanted to come with him so he could show her around. Orihime, who always wanted to explore life outside her weaving routine, immediately agreed. 

Orihime and Hikoboshi had so much fun exploring the skies. They became friends easily, and soon they felt that they were falling in love with each other. ♡(*´・ω・)(・ω・`*)♡

Orihime was so happy that she forgot to come home. The King of the Skies was so worried, that he sent some magpies to search for her and guide her back to him. When the magpies found her, she ignored them because she didn’t want to come home yet, she wanted to stay with Hikoboshi.

When the magpies returned to the King of the Skies with this news, he was outraged! He fetched Orihime himself, forced her to come home, then destroyed the only bridge on the Heavenly River. He also made the river deeper and wider that it already was. He forbade the two to ever meet again.

Orihime and Hikoboshi were distraught. Orihime understood that as the Weaving Princess, she had certain responsibilities, but she missed Hikoboshi so terribly. With tears in her eyes, she asked her father if they could somehow settle for an agreement. Her father could not bear to see tears in her precious daughter’s eyes, so he told her that if she works hard for a year, he will let her see Hikoboshi once a year, on the 7th day of the 7th month.

From then on, on every 7th day of the 7th month, a flock of magpies forms a bridge on the Heavenly river, allowing Orihime and Hikoboshi to be with each other. In return, Orihime worked hard in weaving clouds, mist and fog for the rest of the year, until the end of time.

The End ~ 

✩✩✩

So that’s the story of the Tanabata!  Hope you enjoyed it~ ♡^▽^♡

www.japanlover.me

www.instagram.com/JapanLoverMe

Art by littlemisspaintbrush

(via inlovewithjapan)